Organic Caspian Sea Yoghurt
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Organic Caspian Sea Yoghurt Starter

  • Organic Certified Culture Icon
  • UKAS Lab Tested Icon
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  • No Yoghurt Maker Required

£6.50

Organic Caspian Sea yoghurt starter also goes by the name of Matsoni. It actually a product of Armenian and Georgian origins. It found its way to the Cocassos region between the Black Sea and Caspian Sea where it gained popularity and became know as Caspian Sea yoghurt.

Organic Caspian Sea Yoghurt Starter

Organic Caspian Sea yoghurt starter also goes by the name of Matsoni. It actually a product of Armenian and Georgian origins. It found its way to the Cocassos region between the Black Sea and Caspian Sea where it gained popularity and became know as Caspian Sea yoghurt. The region is renowned for the longevity of it’s people. It is also extremely popular in Japan and has been the subject of significant clinical research in that country.

It is known as a mesophilic yoghurt; which simply means it can be cultured at room temperature. It is a slightly tart yogurt with a unique viscous consistency. The unique ability to ferment at room temperature makes the organic Caspian Sea yoghurt starter an easy yogurt to prepare at home! Just combine milk and our starter culture, and wait for the magic to happen.

The bacteria responsible for fermentation of Caspian Sea yoghurt are (for the most part) Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactococcus. L. delbrueckii is remarkable because of its ability to survive passage through the entire digestive system (source).

 

Additional information

Weight 2 g
Ingredients

Organic Caspian Sea yoghurt starter culture.

Shelf Life

1 year.

Storage

Keep at room temperature.

Allergens

Contains milk (from cows).

5 Questions about Organic Caspian Sea Yoghurt Starter

  1. Kevin D says:

    I have had my first attempt at making the Caspian Sea Yoghurt – not without some difficulty. I have followed the instructions as noted but, much like another customer above (BEATRIZ), I have almost three distinct layers. One at the bottom – a clotted milky substance, liquid in the middle and a top layer of clotted milky substance. Any thoughts on what I may have done to cause this (though I did follow the instructions as written). Can this be corrected at this point?

    1. Lisa Hillyer says:

      Hi Kevin, That sounds like a failed starter. Can you send us an email to orders@freshlyfermented.co.uk and we will get that replaced for you. Thanks Lisa

  2. Beatriz says:

    Hi, I’m making my first batch of yoghurt. And there is a kind of separation in the jar (a liquid part and a solid part). Is it safe to eat?

    1. Freshly Fermented says:

      Hi, can you email us over a photo please 🙂 orders@freshlyfermented.co.uk

  3. Helen says:

    Have switched milk to goats milk, will that inhibit or bother the yoghurt culturing?

    1. Freshly Fermented says:

      Initially, you might have a few issues due to the lower lactose content but we usually find the culture adapts quickly.

  4. Helen Bond says:

    What are the beneficial strains of bacteria in Caspian Sea yoghurt?

    1. Freshly Fermented says:

      Caspian Sea yoghurt are (for the most part) Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactococcus bacteria 🙂

  5. Helen Bond says:

    Have just finished first batch of yoghurt. When making another batch should it be left at room temperature until it thickens the same as with the starter? Thanks

    1. Lisa Hillyer says:

      Hi, yes you need to let it ferment at room temperature every time you make a new batch.

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